content:normal_eeg_in_children

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
content:normal_eeg_in_children [2020/02/17 19:50]
icna
content:normal_eeg_in_children [2020/02/23 17:28] (current)
icna [Introduction]
Line 1: Line 1:
 ====== Normal EEG in children ====== ====== Normal EEG in children ======
-===== Introduction ===== 
 The electroencephalograms (EEGs) of infants and children are normally characterized by a greater mixture of waveforms and frequencies than is found in adults.The relative predominance of these wave types varies with age. There may be considerable intersubject variability,​ possibly because of differences in maturation. The electroencephalograms (EEGs) of infants and children are normally characterized by a greater mixture of waveforms and frequencies than is found in adults.The relative predominance of these wave types varies with age. There may be considerable intersubject variability,​ possibly because of differences in maturation.
 Several waveforms, such as the initial response to hyperventilation and posterior slow rhythms of youth, may be normally asymmetrical. Several waveforms, such as the initial response to hyperventilation and posterior slow rhythms of youth, may be normally asymmetrical.
 +
 Moreover, infants and young children tend to become drowsy during the recording, and the electrographic alterations with drowsiness are greater than those with adults. These factors create wider limits of normality than might be expected in adults. In addition, the superimposition of two or more waveforms often creates sharply contoured waves that can be mistaken for spikes. Fortunately,​ most of the clinically significant EEG abnormalities in children are morphologically well defined. However, to identify abnormalities in children'​s EEGs with confidence, it is first necessary to sharpen one's concept of normal features and their variations. Moreover, infants and young children tend to become drowsy during the recording, and the electrographic alterations with drowsiness are greater than those with adults. These factors create wider limits of normality than might be expected in adults. In addition, the superimposition of two or more waveforms often creates sharply contoured waves that can be mistaken for spikes. Fortunately,​ most of the clinically significant EEG abnormalities in children are morphologically well defined. However, to identify abnormalities in children'​s EEGs with confidence, it is first necessary to sharpen one's concept of normal features and their variations.
 ==== Normal Awake ==== ==== Normal Awake ====
  • content/normal_eeg_in_children.txt
  • Last modified: 5 weeks ago
  • by icna