Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Congenital Heart Disease: From Fetal Pathogenesis to Prevention

Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Congenital Heart Disease: From Fetal Pathogenesis to Prevention

 
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CME Available
Yes
Date
Thursday 22 October 2020
Time
10:30 AM – 12:30 PM
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Course Description
This symposium will bring participants up-to-date on the critical role of fetal risk factors for neurodevelopmental disabilities arising from congenital heart disease including the key contributions of chronic fetal hypoxemia and maternal-fetal stress. Emerging insights from fetal and neonatal human imaging and experimental models will define the impact of fetal hypoxemia on brain growth and neuronal dysmaturation. We will explore emerging potential interventions ranging from maternal-fetal hyperoxygenation to early life environmental enrichment.

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize the spectrum of neurodevelopmental disabilities associated with various forms of congenital heart disease and their key fetal and neonatal neuroimaging findings.
  2. Recognize the relative impact of pre- and postnatal factors, including maternal-fetal stress and chronic in utero hypoxemia on long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with various forms of congenital heart disease.

Impact Statements

  1. Counselling parents on risks for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with various forms of congenital heart disease.
  2. Indications and interpretation of fetal or neonatal imaging for patients with various forms of congenital heart disease.

Organizer: Stephen A. Back, MD, PhD; Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA

Fetal Oxygenation in Utero of Human Fetuses with Congenital Heart Disease
Mette Høj Lauridsen, MD, PhD; Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark

Advanced Brain Imaging- from Fetus to Neonate with Congenital Heart Disease
Serena J. Counsell, PhD; King’s College London, London, UK

Pathogenetic Mechanisms of Hypoxia-mediated Cerebral Dysmaturation
Stephen A. Back, MD, PhD

Where to Next: Potential Interventions from the Fetus to the Environment
Steven Paul Miller, MDCM, MAS, FRCPC; The Hospital for Sick Children, The University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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